O Gato que Canta (YouTube)

 

O Gato que Canta (YouTube)

“A guy sings a duet with his cat Chaninho. You’ll recognize the song, even though it’s sung in Portuguese. “If you’re happy and you know it, say meow.” Chaninho has his part down perfectly.” — Neatorama

Confira a rara oportunidade de ver Chaninho, o gato que canta, em um ensaio exclusivo para seu próximo número no Teatro Municipal.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z7tHTLd-WWA&feature=youtu.be

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Free PDF book: William Shakespeare’s Measure for Measure: A Retelling in Prose by David Bruce

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I Love Ireland

There’s no one as Irish as Barack OBama (YouTube)

Music by Corrigan Brothers.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4Xkw8ip43Vk

Marriage Equality: Bring Your Family With You (YouTube)

Irish LGBT youth and parents coalition call for a Yes vote in the forthcoming marriage equality referendum. The BeLonG To lead coalition call on everyone to talk to their family and friends about why marriage equality is so important and to work for a Yes vote.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AkwYEhjjZhs

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Free PDF book: William Shakespeare’s Measure for Measure: A Retelling in Prose by David Bruce

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Free PDF book: Honey Badger Goes to Hell — and Heaven by Martina Donna Ramone and David Bruce

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David Bruce: Work Anecdotes

An efficiency expert started working at a movie studio, but the screenwriters rebelled at such changes as pencil sharpeners being taken from their offices and replaced by a couple of pencil sharpeners in the hall. In addition, the efficiency expert stopped the deliveries of coffee to the writers’ rooms. One writer, Harry Ruskin, started using pencils at the phenomenal rate of three dozen an hour. The efficiency expert investigated and discovered that Mr. Ruskin was writing a few words with each pencil, then tossing them out of the window because “it wouldn’t be economical for a man making 50 cents a minute to walk down the corridor and sharpen them.” The efficient expert next discovered a group of writers gathered in the hall, where they had cut a hole in the rug, started a fire, and were making coffee because they claimed it was more efficient for them to make their own coffee than to walk to the commissary to buy it. The writers won — the efficiency expert was fired.

 When he was 18 years old, Italian baritone Giuseppe De Luca got a job recording arias onto cylinders used in a primitive kind of jukebox which played music whenever the customer inserted a small coin. This job was not quite ethical, but Mr. De Luca took it because his family needed the money. What was unethical about it? The arias he recorded were attributed not to him, but to the world’s greatest baritones. (As tenor and author Nigel Douglas points out, this may have been good training for Mr. De Luca’s later performances as Giacomo Puccini’s confidence man, Gianni Schicchi.

 Soprano Adelina Patti once lost her voice after two acts and was unable to finish the opera “Don Pasquale.” The director of the opera house was frantic, and having noticed another soprano, Madame Volpini, in the audience, he asked her to take over for Ms. Patti. Madame Volpini was no fool — she did take over, but at considerable advantage to herself. Her contract had not been renewed for the following year, but she managed to negotiate both a one-year contract and a raise of 5,000 francs before taking over for Ms. Patti.

 In its “Frozen Wages,” the San Francisco Mime Troupe uses juggling to show the effects of layoffs on workers. Several people begin juggling, but one by one the jugglers are laid off, leaving a smaller number of jugglers to juggle all the clubs that the large group had been juggling. The number of jugglers gets smaller and smaller, the number of clubs remains the same, the jugglers work harder and harder, and the clubs are thrown faster and faster until one too many juggler is laid off and everything collapses.

 Of course, John F. Kennedy came from a very wealthy family, and he worried that it might keep him from getting the votes of workers. In West Virginia, he met a coal miner who asked if it was true that Mr. Kennedy had never had to do a hard day’s work outside of military service. Mr. Kennedy admitted that it was true, and the coal miner replied, “You haven’t missed a thing.”

 Before becoming famous as the author of the Harry Potter books, J.K. Rowling was the worst secretary ever. At meetings, she would sit and take notes — but the notes weren’t about the meeting, they were about plot ideas and characters. Another reason she was frequently fired was that she typed her manuscripts while she was supposed to be working.

Like many writers, Quentin Tarantino, famous for his movies “Reservoir Dogs,” “Pulp Fiction,” “Jackie Brown,” etc., worked at odd jobs before becoming famous. He once worked on a workout video starring Dolph Lundgren. (Mr. Tarantino’s job was cleaning doggy doodoo off the parking lot so Mr. Lundgren wouldn’t get his outfit dirty.)

 In the early days of television, technical directors worked long hours. After working 30 hours in a row — with no sleep — on the “Colgate Comedy Hour,” Bob Finch collapsed during its live performance. The producer, worried about the show on the air, yelled, “Somebody get an ambulance — but first, get me a replacement for Finch.”

 Like many illustrators of children’s books, Pat Cummings frequently gives presentations in schools about her career. After one presentation, she received a letter from a girl who wrote that she had wanted to be an illustrator, but since Ms. Cummings had revealed how much work it was, she now wanted to be a lawyer.

 Thomas Eakins was an instructor at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts in the 19th century. He believed that artists ought to have a thorough knowledge of human anatomy, and he was fired after someone walked into his studio and discovered cadavers — which Mr. Eakins had been dissecting.

 Freddie Fox, a stutterer, wrote comedy for Bob Hope. Mr. Hope formed the habit of calling Mr. Fox at all hours for jokes, and Mr. Fox got tired of this habit. On the telephone, Mr. Fox said, “Bbbbob, you ttttake your jjjjob and ssssh ….” Mr. Hope said, “It’s OK, Fred; I get the idea,” then hung up.

 Singer Al Jolson was a very popular guest star on radio programs — he once guested on 10 shows in one week! While he was guesting on the Burns and Allen program, Gracie asked why he didn’t get his own program. Jolie replied, “What? And be on the radio only once a week?”

 Bruce Degen, author/illustrator of such children’s books as “Jamberry,” used to ride the subway to work, stay at work all day, and then come home. Now, he picks up a cup of coffee at home, tells his wife, “I’m off to the office, dear,” then walks upstairs.

 Italian soprano Claudia Muzio used to stay occasionally at the Grand Hotel in Milan, which displayed a portrait of Giuseppe Verdi in her apartment. One day, Ms. Muzio asked the portrait, “I wonder if you know how much work you have brought my way.”

© 2015, David Bruce, All Rights Reserved

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Free PDF book: William Shakespeare’s Measure for Measure: A Retelling in Prose by David Bruce

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Free PDF book: Honey Badger Goes to Hell — and Heaven by Martina Donna Ramone and David Bruce

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Robert Cook: A Human Shield

A Human Shield

On July 29, 2006, Australian tourist Kimberley Dear, 21, took a skydiving lesson at an airport near St. Louis, Missouri. Tragically, the plane developed engine problems after takeoff and crashed. The skydiving instructor, Robert Cook, 22, was able to save the life of Kimberley by acting as a human shield to cushion her, although he and five other people died. Kimberley’s father, Bill, said about Mr. Cook, “When he realized the plane was actually going to crash, he grabbed Kimberley and he calmly talked to her and he told her that the plane was going to crash. [He] told her what to expect and what to do and kept her calm and focused her attention on him and what he was saying rather than what was happening around her. […] as the plane was coming down, he put his arms around her and pulled her close. As he pulled her close, her head rested on his shoulders. He put his head against hers to stop it flopping around. He said to her, ‘As the plane is about to hit the ground, make sure you’re on top of me so that I’ll take the force of the impact.’ The plane actually hit, they believe, a power pole or a power line and it went into a vertical situation, and she became a little bit disoriented, but she felt Robert actually twist his body around until Kim was on top of him and when the plane hit the ground, he took the full force of the impact.” Kimberley’s sister, Tracey Dear, said, “There’s nothing … I can’t even put it into words, but the only thing I can think of is saying thank you so much. I can’t believe that in this world when so many people are so jaded that there are people out there like that. He met Kimberley, as far as I know, that day. I would do that for her but I can’t believe that a stranger who just met her would knowingly give up his life for her. I just want his family to know we appreciate that from the bottom of our heart.” In 2008, the Governor-General of Australia awarded Mr. Cook the Star of Courage. Kimberley said, “There aren’t many people who would put their life on the line for a stranger—you might do it for the people you love, but would you do it for someone you just met?” Kimberley was severely injured in the plane crash, but she learned to walk again.

For More Information: “Skydiver’s bravery saves Aussie’s life.” The Sydney Morning Herald. 2 August 2006 <http://www.smh.com.au/news/national/skydivers-bravery-saves-aussies-life/2006/08/02/1154198169252.html>.

For More Information: Dan Silkstone, “Father’s tears for battered daughter lying in pain.” The Age. 11 January 2007 <http://www.theage.com.au/news/national/fathers-tears-for-battered-daughter-lying-in-pain/2007/01/10/1168105052459.html?page=fullpage#contentSwap2>.

For More Information: Jordan Baker and Beck Eleven, “Bravest of the brave honoured for selfless acts.” The Sydney Morning Herald. 17 March 2008 <http://www.smh.com.au/news/national/at-23-he-gave-his-life-to-save-another/2008/03/16/1205602195110.html>.

Kimberley DearSource:

http://www.cracked.com/photoplasty_803_22-inspiring-acts-kindness-that-no-one-ever-talks-about/

For More Information:

22 Inspiring Acts of Kindness That No One Ever Talks About (Cracked)

While we here at Cracked consider it our duty to shatter the illusions that hold your fragile life together, we also try to spread some good vibes to make up for it. Our readers have gathered a collection of inspirational acts of kindness that will make you feel just a little bit better about the world.

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Romance Books by Brenda Kennedy (Some Free)

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Free PDF book: William Shakespeare’s Measure for Measure: A Retelling in Prose by David Bruce

https://davidbruceblog.wordpress.com/2015/03/26/free-pdf-williams-shakespeares-measure-for-measure-a-retelling-in-prose-by-david-bruce/

Free PDF book: Honey Badger Goes to Hell — and Heaven by Martina Donna Ramone and David Bruce

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halfprincesshalfgoddess: Atheist Arya

Hell Air Conditioning

For More Information:

http://halfprincesshalfgoddess.tumblr.com

http://knowyourmeme.com/memes/atheist-arya

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Free PDF book: Honey Badger Goes to Hell — and Heaven by Martina Donna Ramone and David Bruce

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2-year-old and garbage man’s special bond is priceless‬ (YouTube)

2-year-old and garbage man’s special bond is priceless (YouTube)

“When you are two years old, there’s nothing more impressive than a big truck that comes to your house. And this one comes every week! Little Deacon Ross looked forward to seeing O.D. and his garbage truck every Friday. And the sanitation worker made friends with the toddler. But now the family is moving away, and USA Today showed up for O.D.’s last run by Deacon’s house.” — Neatorama

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TUmGqC0Xv0A&feature=youtu.be

Download free eBooks, including books for teachers, by David Bruce here:

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Romance Books by Brenda Kennedy (Some Free)

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Free PDF book: William Shakespeare’s Measure for Measure: A Retelling in Prose by David Bruce

https://davidbruceblog.wordpress.com/2015/03/26/free-pdf-williams-shakespeares-measure-for-measure-a-retelling-in-prose-by-david-bruce/

Free PDF book: Honey Badger Goes to Hell — and Heaven by Martina Donna Ramone and David Bruce

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David Bruce: The Coolest People in the Arts

Art

Johnny Brewton is the creator behind the zine X-Ray, each issue of which consists of 226 copies, each one at least slightly different. It was definitely an artistic project, and lifetime subscribers included the J. Paul Getty Museum, the rare book department of S.U.N.Y. at Buffalo, and the University of Wisconsin. One contributor was Hunter S. Thompson, who helped create the cover of X-Ray #4 by putting on lipstick and kissing a few copies and by shooting a bullet through every copy. (The cover was a photograph of Marilyn Chambers holding a box of Ivory Snow.) Another contributor to X-Ray was Charles Bukowski, who impressed Mr. Brewton with his work ethic: Mr. Brewton wrote Mr. Bukowski on a Monday requesting some poems, and by that Saturday—not even a week later—he received an envelope containing some poems. Mr. Brewton says about Mr. Bukowski, “I was amazed at how generous he was—he really gave back a lot and supported small presses; he taught me a lot about professionalism and deadlines. He was always on time.” Yet another contributor was Timothy Leary. Mr. Leary’s publicist, however, in a phone conversation told Mr. Brewton, “Mr. Leary has to charge one dollar per word for articles and stories. Are you sure you want to do this?” Because the zine made basically zero money, Mr. Brewton sarcastically replied, “That fits my budget perfectly! I’ll buy one word.” The publicist asked, “Which word do you want?” Mr. Brewton replied, “I don’t know. Have Mr. Leary decide.” The publicist spoke to Mr. Leary, and Mr. Brewton overheard Mr. Leary say, “That’s great! Yes! I pick the word ‘Chaos’—that’s my piece!” Mr. Brewton titled the work “A One Word Dosage from Dr. Timothy Leary” and put a card saying “Chaos” inside a pill envelope—each of the 226 copies of the issue contained the one-word contribution.”

Pablo Picasso was a true artist. Another artist, photographer Yousuf Karsh, once took Picasso’s portrait. At first, Karsh was going to take the portrait at Picasso’s home, but Picasso’s children were boisterous and did such things as ride bicycles throughout the rooms; therefore, Picasso suggested that they meet at his ceramics gallery in Valluris and have the photo shoot there. When Karsh showed up at the gallery with 200 pounds of photography equipment, the gallery owner told him, “He will never be here. He says the same thing to every photographer.” Fortunately, Picasso did show up for the photo shoot. Karsh remembers, “He could partially view himself in my large format lens and intuitively moved to complete the composition.” 

When Andy Warhola was a senior at Carnegie Institute of Technology (its name now is Carnegie Mellon University), he submitted a self-portrait to the Associated Artists of Pittsburgh Annual Exhibition—the painting was titled The Broad Gave Me My Face, but I Can Pick My Own Nose. Perhaps this particular title was a mistake, but Mr. Warhola liked mistakes. The very first time an illustration of his appeared in Glamour magazine, his name was misspelled “Warhol.” From that time on, he decided to be Andy Warhol instead of Andy Warhola. 

When Renaissance artist Michelangelo Buonarroti was painting his Last Judgment on the altar wall of the Sistine Chapel, a man named Biagio da Cesena criticized it because of its nude figures. Michelangelo got his revenge by putting Biagio da Cesena into the painting. In the lowest level of hell, he appears as a horned beast.

Impressionist painter Claude Monet often painted outside. If you look closely at his 1870 painting titled The Beach at Trouville, you can see grains of sand that the wind blew onto the wet paint.

Copyright 2015 by Bruce D. Bruce.

Note: The above are the first five anecdotes from my book The Coolest People in the Arts: 250 Anecdotes and Stories, which is available here:

http://www.amazon.com/The-Coolest-People-Arts-Anecdotes/dp/1329110668

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/159914

https://store.kobobooks.com/en-US/ebook/the-coolest-people-in-the-arts-250-anecdotes-and-stories

http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/the-coolest-people-in-the-arts-david-bruce/1112037380?ean=2940033218677

http://www.lulu.com/shop/david-bruce/the-coolest-people-in-the-arts-250-anecdotes-and-stories/paperback/product-22184659.html

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Coolest-People-Arts-Anecdotes-Stories/dp/1329110668/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1432429842&sr=8-1&keywords=coolest+people+arts+david+bruce

http://www.amazon.ca/Coolest-People-Arts-Anecdotes-Stories/dp/1329110668/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1432429875&sr=8-1&keywords=coolest+people+arts

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