How Do I Use “Your” And “You’re”?

your = possessive form of you

Ex: Your coat is in that closet.

Ex: Your car is at the carwash.

you’re = contraction of you are

Ex: You’re standing in the rain.

Ex: You’re an incredibly sensitive woman.

Morris “Moe” Feinberg was the brother of Larry Fine, one of the Three Stooges. Mr. Feinberg went to a nightclub in Atlantic City, where an entertainer recognized him and introduced him to the audience, talking about the Three Stooges and saying, “I see Larry’s brother, Moe Fine, a good friend and a fellow performer. Moe, would you stand up and take a bow?” Afterward, a woman came up and asked for Mr. Feinberg’s autograph. He explained that he was only a small-time performer and not famous, but the woman smiled and said, “You can’t fool me with that ‘brother’ stuff. You’re Larry, all right.” Mr. Feinberg signed the autograph, “With warm regards, Larry ‘Stooge’ Fine.”

Jim Carrey was funny even as a youngster. One of his “acts” was to put a lot of colored candies in his mouth, chew them up, and then pretend to vomit. His very young audience loved it. In school, he once got in trouble when his teacher saw him mocking some musicians on a record. Fortunately, all turned out well. Thinking to embarrass him, his teacher ordered him to do what he was doing in front of the class. Young Jim did, and he was so funny that his teacher invited to do the act at the school’s Christmas assembly. And when his mother became ill, Jim’s comedy cheered her up—sometimes at odd times. Occasionally, his father would wake him up and say, “Sorry to wake you up in the middle of the night, but your mother and I could use a good laugh. You’re on in five.”

In 1924, the Prince of Wales visited Fanny Brice’s apartment in New York. She told him, “Sit down, kid, and take off your shoes. While you’re relaxing, I’ll whip up a couple of smoked sturgeon sandwiches on rye with some marvelous pickles a guy on Delancey Street puts up for me.” The Prince of Wales told her, “Miss Brice, I thank you from the bottom of my heart,” then he took off his shoes.

Comedian Jimmy Durante started out in show business as a piano player. Singer and comedian Eddie Cantor was the first person to urge Jimmy to get up on stage and away from the piano: “Piano playing is going to get you nothing. You’ll be a piano player till you’re a hundred years. You gotta look further than that. People like you a whole lot. So why don’t you get up on the floor and say something to the people?” Eventually, of course, Mr. Durante took Mr. Cantor’s advice. However, his immediate reaction was, “Gee, Eddie, I wouldn’t do that. I’d be afraid that people would laugh at me.”

When she was a little girl, actress Samantha Morton attended drama club with other little kids. For one lesson, she was supposed to improvise a scene with another little girl. The two girls stood in front of the group, and the drama teacher whispered to little Samantha the theme of the improvisation: “The other girl’s stolen your hamster.” Samantha responded by improvising in her own way. She says, “I beat the crap out of this girl, and they didn’t ask me back.”

Not every family is happy. While growing up, actor Corbin Bernsen did not have a really good relationship with his father, and at one point, during the process of getting a divorce, his mother was drinking way too much. In addition, Corbin was going through a process of teenage rebellion and blaming his parents for it. Corbin says, “I was a typical kid, getting high and acting crazy. And I said, ‘Well, Mom is this’ and ‘I do this because of that’ and ‘What do you expect?’” His father then taught him an important lesson. Corbin remembers, “My dad said, ‘You have a choice in life. You can be happy or you can be sad. But don’t blame anybody else other than yourself. If your life is going to be screwed up, don’t blame me or your mom.’” He decided to become an actor after seeing his mother on the stage in a production of The Miracle Worker, following which he thought, “Wow, that’s my mother up there, the crazy woman who makes my dinner. Look at what she’s doing!’” She also taught him an important lesson: “She said, ‘I don’t mind you following what I’m doing. You’ve seen the ups and downs. The only thing I demand of you is that you love and respect your craft. It doesn’t matter if you’re doing a commercial or a movie, just love it. Love all of it.’”

One problem that many actors have is acting in bad weather conditions of extreme heat or extreme cold, often at unpleasant times such as night or very early in the morning. In her acting, Laura Linney deals with industrial-strength issues such as death, illness and personal failure. However, she says, “You know what’s more difficult, what they don’t teach you in drama school? How to act at 4:30 in the morning in the freezing cold or boiling heat. That’s more challenging than any sort of emotional work. And it’s like childbirth. You forget about it once a movie’s finished and you’re on to the next.” While acting in the 2007 remake of 3:10 to Yuma, Russell Crowe ran into the problem of an unpleasant acting environment: “We were surrounded by four-and-a-half feet of snow doing scenes where we’re talking about the drought.”

YOUR

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